Anti-racist Books for Kids

Hey y’all. It’s Jess again bringing you some anti-racist information.

In my last anti-racist post, I focused on one book, Antiracist baby by Ibram X. Kendi (LINK BLOG) but I wanted to bring y’all more options, so you can grow your library.

Books that teach about the life experiences of BIPOC (LINK what bipoc is) are incredibly important for all children.

Books that have non-white characters are essential in raising children who appreciate differences instead of pretending they don’t exist.

We need to see color. See it, appreciate it, love it, and learn from it.

These are just a few books to begin working on your anti-racist library. It is a small but meaningful step when raising anti-racist children.

1. Mae Among the Stars

When Little Mae was a child, she dreamed of dancing in space. She imagined herself surrounded by billions of stars, floating, gliding, and discovering.

She wanted to be an astronaut.

Her mom told her, “If you believe it, and work hard for it, anything is possible.”

Little Mae’s curiosity, intelligence, and determination, matched with her parents’ encouraging words, paved the way for her incredible success at NASA as the first African American woman to travel in space.

This book will inspire other young girls to reach for the stars, to aspire for the impossible, and to persist with childlike imagination.”

2. The Proudest Blue

“With her new backpack and light-up shoes, Faizah knows the first day of school is going to be special. It’s the start of a brand new year and, best of all, it’s her older sister Asiya’s first day of hijab–a hijab of beautiful blue fabric, like the ocean waving to the sky. But not everyone sees hijab as beautiful, and in the face of hurtful, confusing words, Faizah will find new ways to be strong.

Paired with Hatem Aly’s beautiful, whimsical art, Olympic medalist Ibtihaj Muhammad and Morris Award finalist S.K. Ali bring readers an uplifting, universal story of new experiences, the unbreakable bond between siblings, and of being proud of who you are.”

3. Mango, Abuela, and Me

“Mia’s abuela has left her sunny house with parrots and palm trees to live with Mia and her parents in the city. While they cook, Mia helps Abuela learn English, and Mia learns some Spanish, too, but it’s still hard for Abuela to learn enough words to tell Mia her stories. Then Mia sees a parrot in the pet-shop window and has the perfecto idea for how to help them all communicate a little better.

Here is an endearing tale that speaks loud and clear about the love that binds families across the generations.”

4. Water Protectors

“Inspired by the many Indigenous-led movements across North America, We Are Water Protectors issues an wurgent rallying cry to safeguard the Earth’s water from harm and corruption―a bold and lyrical picture book written by Carole Lindstrom and vibrantly illustrated by Michaela Goade.
Water is the first medicine.
It affects and connects us all . . .

When a black snake threatens to destroy the Earth
And poison her people’s water, one young water protector
Takes a stand to defend Earth’s most sacred resource.”

5. A Big Mooncake for Little Star

Pat, pat, pat…

Little Star’s soft feet tiptoed to the Big Mooncake.

Little Star loves the delicious Mooncake that she bakes with her mama. But she’s not supposed to eat any yet! What happens when she can’t resist a nibble?

In this stunning picture book that shines as bright as the stars in the sky, Newbery Honor author Grace Lin creates a heartwarming original story that explains phases of the moon.”

All of these books would make excellent additions to any young readers library. This is by no means a comprehensive list. It is merely a starting point for anyone struggling to find where to begin building a library that represents multiple cultures and voices.

What are some of your favorite kids’ books that have BIPOC characters? What about books that were written by BIPOC?

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